Wednesday, 16 April 2014

Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic

Chinese Salad Recipe Biography
Source(google.com.pk)
Food historians tell us salads (generally defined as mixed greens with dressing) were enjoyed by ancient Romans and Greeks. As time progressed, salads became more complicated. Recipes varied according to place and time. Dinner salads, as we know them today, were popular with Renaissance folks. Composed salads assembled with layers of ingredients were enjoyed in the 18th century. They were called Salmagundi. Today they are called chef's salad.

Why do we call it salad? 
The basis for the word salad is 'sal', meaning salt. This was chosen because in ancient times, salt was often an ingredient in the dressing. Notes here:

"Salad, a term derived from the Latin sal (salt), which yielded the form salata, 'salted things' such as the raw vegetables eaen in classical times with a dressing of oil, vinegar or salt. The word turns up in Old French as salade and then in late 14th century English as salad or sallet." 
"Salad greens, which did have to be served raw and crisp, demanded more complicated measures. The object of scientific salad making was to subdue the raw greens until they bore as little resemblance as possible to their natural state. If a plain green salad was called for, the experts tried to avoid simply letting a disorganized pile of leaves drop messily onto the plate...This arduous approach to salad making became an identifying feature of cooking-school cookery and the signature of a refined household...American salads traditionally had been a matter of fresh greens, chicken, or lobster, but during the decades at the turn of the century, when urban and suburban middle class was beginning to define itself, salads proliferated magnificently in number and variety until they incorporated nearly every kind of food except bread and pastry...Salads that were nothing but a heap of raw ingredients in dissaray plainly lacked cultivation, and the cooking experts developed a number of ingenious ways to wrap them up...The tidiest and most thorough way to package a salad was to mold in in gelatin."
The salad consists of greens (classically romaine lettuce) with a garlic vinaigrette dressing. In the 1930s, Caesar Salad was voted by the master chefs of the International Society of Epicures in Paris as the "greatest recipe to originate from the Americas in fifty years."

1903 - George Leonard Herter, is his book Bull Cook and Authentic Historical Recipes and Practices, Volume II, gives his account on who invented the Caesar Salad. NOTE:  As I can not find any historical references to back this story, is it a myth or fact? Definition of myth - A story containing within and having about it certain identifiable characteristics that are sometimes use to designate a story or the understanding of some matter as fictional and even downright false. You be the judge:

"Caesar salad was invented in about 1903 by Giacomo Junia, an Italian cook in Chicago, Illinois. Giacomo Junia was the cook in a small restaurant called The New York Cafe. He catered to American tastes as spaghetti and pizza in those days were little eaten by anyone including Italians. It is sometimes falsely stated that this salad was invented in Tijuana, Mexico during the prohibition period and also in San Francisco. Nothing could be further from the truth. The only thing invented in Tijuana were the finest methods every produced to clip tourists.

Giacomo Junia called the salad Caesar Salad. He put a few pieces of Cos lettuce (romaine) in the salad to add a slightly bitter touch to it. . . Giacomo called the salad Caesar Salad after Julius Caesar, the greatest Italian of all time. . . . Junia never thought that the salad would be popular and was more surprised than anyone when people began to ask for it. Many itinerant cooks learned how to make the salad and soon it was made all over North America and even in Europe."
Chinese Chicken Salad

When chicken Caesar loses appeal, this salad, with its soy dressing and fried wontons, is a substitute worth the betrayal.
ingredients
For fried wontons (optional)
20 square wonton wrappers, thawed if frozen
About 2 1/2 cups vegetable oil
For salad
1/2 pound snow peas, trimmed 1 lb Napa cabbage, cored, then cut crosswise into 1/3-inch-wide strips (about 6 cups)
1 (1-lb) head of romaine, torn into bite-size pieces (about 8 cups)
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon Asian sesame oil
1/4 cup vegetable oil
6 cups coarsely shredded cooked chicken (from a 2 1/2-lb rotisserie chicken)
1/2 cup chopped scallions
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/2 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted
Special equipment: a deep-fat thermometer (if making wontons)
preparation

Make fried wontons:
Cut wonton wrappers into 1/2-inch-wide strips and separate on paper towels.

Heat 3/4 inch oil in a wide 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderate heat until it registers 350°F on thermometer. Fry strips, 5 or 6 at a time, gently turning over once with a slotted spoon, until just golden, 15 to 30 seconds per batch (some strips will fold and curl). Transfer to paper towels to drain, then season with salt.

Make salad:
Cook snow peas in a 4-quart pot of boiling salted water until crisp-tender, about 1 1/2 minutes. Transfer with a slotted spoon to a bowl of ice and cold water to stop cooking, then drain in a colander and pat dry. Cut diagonally into 1-inch-wide pieces and put in a large bowl with cabbage and romaine.

Whisk together soy sauce, lemon juice, sugar, vinegar, salt, and pepper in a small bowl, then add sesame oil and vegetable oil in a slow stream, whisking until sugar is dissolved and dressing is combined well. Toss chicken and scallions with 1/3 cup of dressing in another large bowl. Whisk remaining dressing (it will separate), then add cabbage mixture, cilantro, almonds, and sesame seeds to chicken and toss with enough remaining dressing to coat. Sprinkle with wontons (if using).
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic
Chinese Salad Recipe Chinese Recipes With Chicken by Chef Zakir For Kids Soup Images In Urdu Chicken Shashlik Bitter Gourd Urdu Fish Authentic

No comments:

Post a Comment